How Media Consumption is Changing

Posted: August 20, 2013 in 21C, digital culture, edushifts, mlearning
Tags: ,

Before the dawn of the Internet, who would have ever dreamed that the supremacy of network television would ever be challenged? The impact of television on our society has been so pronounced that it changed our communication habits, social habits, and even house design and organization. Today, the Internet has, and continues to be, changing this prior revolution and changing it rapidly.

TVWhile the Internet has been mainstream for around 20 years, only recently have we had the infrastructure in place to support the type of communication needed to challenge the dominance of the network television framework. What changes have resulted? Internet and mobile use has skyrocketed. This Infographic is just one example of how the use of the internet is expanding quickly. Of note for this blog is the section in the Infographic on online video consumption. Another consequence: the once mighty Blockbuster video has gone the way of the dodo thanks to online streaming services such as iTunes and Netflix. These same services are also putting massive pressure on cable service providers as many people begin to cut their cable and rely solely on steaming media.

While I myself have not yet cut the cord on cable, I have been investigating alternative sources and starting to reorganize the way I consume media for an eventual cord cut on cable. I have found that while solutions are available, cutting the cord on cable is not a seamless feat yet for one major reason: limited access to live feeds or live video events.

Allow me to elaborate. In terms of watching movies or TV shows, there are services such as YouTube, Hulu, Netflix and iTunes – much of what one needs is there and no cable service can match the selection nor the convenience provided by those services. When it comes to news feeds, I have noticed that some TV networks have begun to stream their live news feeds or morning shows online. Once can access these streams on a television using available tools such as a simple iPhone and Apple TV connection. We can stream those shows on our TV as if the feed were coming from a cable line. What is currently problematic is live sports or other live events broadcast on TV. I have yet to find a legal solution to this problem and is what has kept me from cutting cable. However, even as I write this, this scenario is starting to change as some sporting leagues, such as the NFL and NHL, are providing access to games by purchasing online streaming packages.

While not yet as elegant and smooth as simply ordering a TV package from a cable provider, online solutions are catching up. This will benefit consumers as cable packages are not cheap. With shows broadcast at inconvenient times (PVRs have helped with this point but are not cheap) and with so many channels that we pay for that go unwatched, paying for cable service is no longer an efficient model of content delivery. The Internet is changing media consumption because it allows us to watch video on demand, either without cost or very cheaply, and the quality of bandwidth and streaming video is improving quickly.

web browsersImplications for our education systems: With the increase of cheap or free videos on the web, access to video materials to support learning needs is becoming an important resources – mainly because of the on-demand nature of the videos. Of course, educators need to ensure that copyright and licensing agreements are adhered to – this will be dependent on local laws and school district policies. Nevertheless, the need to spend valuable school monetary resources purchasing video content that quickly becomes obsolete (if not the content, then the format it’s viewed on) is no longer necessary.

Due to the fact that it still takes some effort to access online video, especially as a cable replacement, cord cutting is not happening as quickly as it could be. However, in time, even network TV will realize that effectiveness and efficiency of online streaming for the consumer. When that day arrives, cable companies who have not yet diversifies into other businesses will also go the way of the dodo.

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