Thinking About the Future of the Mobile

Posted: September 26, 2008 in cell_phone, digital culture, edushifts, mobilelearning
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I guess before we can truly look at using mobile devices for learning, we have to accept the plausibility of mobile devices as a platform for learning.  One argument for the use of mobile devices for learning can be the shear ubiquity of cell phones in the world and what becomes possible in a world where the majority of humans, including kids, have voice, video and data connected devices in their pockets at all times.  Here is an article published on the Google blog on the future of mobile technology.

http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2008/09/future-of-mobile.html

I think that we all sort of realize the powerful impact a connected mini-computer can have on our lives, especially considering that more people in the world (approx. 3.3 billion people) have a cell phone than a car, landline or credit card (according to this blog post).  Connect this with ITU’s (International Communications Union) prediction that 4 billion users will have a cell phone by the end of the year and what we have is a ubiquitous foundational platform for collaboration and information sharing.  While the posts don’t specifically talk about learning, consider how different learning will need to be if it is to be relevant to the needs of this hyper-connected society.  Consider what is possible when students can collaborate instantaneously and in meaningful ways with students thousands of kilometres away in this new emerging global learning environment.

Comments
  1. Dominic says:

    The idea of teachers being able to push out reference links and classmates being able to share their online research through their mobiles can revolutionise education. The Future of Mobile is finally gathering momentum… http://www.future-of-mobile.com/2008/london/

  2. Dave says:

    I agree. Finally they are making something constructive for the classroom.

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